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How do I treat my corns ? What is the cure for corns ? How do I stop getting corns ? : Podiatry FAQs : 26

by Stephanie on September 8, 2010

Corns and Calluses

A painful corn Corn on plantar foot surface.

Corns and callus are both derived from the non-living upper layer of the skin called the stratum corneum. The good news is that, because this skin is not alive, it contains no nerves and no blood vessels. Removing corns and callus therefore is both a simple and painless procedure. No matter how painful they are when you walk in, the podiatrist can remove your corns without damage to the good, living skin and without trauma to you.  No anaesthetic or injections are required. Even better, the pain of walking will be reduced immediately, just like the pain of walking on a pebble would be immediately reduced by removing it from your shoe.

How to keep the corn from forming again depends on what caused it to form in the first place.  If the problem was footwear related, the podiatrist can give you specific instructions on what aspect of the shoes has caused the problem and therefore what to avoid in the future. If the issue is related to your foot structure, it is usually possible to custom make a simple insole or shoe insert to deflect the pressure away from the problem site.

Now that you know that corns are not alive, you can see that a corn can’t be killed or poisoned like living tissue such as a mole or a wart could be.  Surgically removing a corn, cutting out the surrounding skin and stitching up the wound, freezing it or burning it have absolutely no chance of working and will only make the surrounding skin angry. At worst, you will end up with a scar under the corn site which will amplify things even more. See a podiatrist, have the corn painlessly removed and learn your options to keep corn forming factors under control in the future. More information is available at our downloadable Corns and Callus Info Page.  Click this link to return to the Podiatry FAQ’s Blog.

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